Danzig

DANZIG

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DANZIG (1987–PRESENT). Glenn Danzig (vocals), John Christ (guitar, replaced by Tommy Victor, Todd Youth, Robert Benkovic), Eerie Von (bass, replaced by Josh Lazie, Howie Pyro, Steve Zing), Chuck Biscuits (drums, replaced by Joey Castillo, Bevan Davies, Johnny Kelly).

Danzig

Danzig

Glenn Danzig is one of the most polarizing figures in music, first on the punk and more recently on the metal scene, where his brilliance was almost outshown by his arrogance and ego. His bands—the Misfits, Samhain, and Danzig—are legendary for their music, but Danzig himself, a bodybuilder with an Elvis-like voice, who is just as likely to compose dark symphonic music as muscular punk—tinged metal, remains an enigma to many in the punk and metal communities who wonder why Danzig the band still fails to live up to its initial promise.

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After splitting from the Misfits and forming the more goth and doom rock oriented Samhain, Danzig began to take more seriously (at least on the surface) the satanic leanings of the Misfits, along with an interest in the new wave of thrash metal that was then sweeping America. In 1987 Danzig took Samhain member Eerie Von with him to found Danzig along with guitarist John Christ and drumming wizard Chuck Biscuits (from DOA and the Circle Jerks). The band found themselves with a surprising hit with the song “Mother” in 1988 on the Danzig record.

Subsequent records were less successful, and eventually Danzig’s ego got in the way of his strategy. As band members were dumped left and right, the band became more of a pet project than a real band. Several tours where Doyle from the Misfits appeared for some songs were highlights of the last few years, but other than that, Danzig has been a lost cause. Danzig took some of the Misfits sound and image and toned it down while bringing to the surface some of the more explicit satanic imagery. The early band was just as good as most metal bands of the time, albeit with Danzig’s powerful set of pipes that set them aside from most other bands in the dark and heavy genre. Sadly, Glenn Danzig is an example of how a singer’s ego can get in the way of the potential musical innovation that was the hallmark of Glenn Danzig for most of his career.

Discography: Danzig (American, 1988); Danzig II: Lucifuge [live] (American, 1990); Danzig III: How the Gods Kill (American, 1992); Danzig IV (American, 1994); Blackacidevil (E-Magine, 1996); 6:66 Satan’s Child (E-Magine, 1999); Live on the Black Hand Side (Restless, 2001 ); I Luciferi (Spitfire, 2002); Circle of Snakes (Evilive, 2004); The Lost Tracks of Danzig (Evilive, 2007).